Grandpa and grandma’s wedding photo taken in front of his silversmith 

shop in Sungei Road in 1935

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Where it all began

1st generation - Grandpa Cher Seong, arrived in Singapore at the age of 15 in 1925. He started working as a silversmith in Chinatown area. By early 1930s, he started his silversmith shop  in Sungei Road.

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The Family of Peranakan Jeweller was born

Kor Far - 2nd generation goldsmith, (2nd from left) in a family portrait taken with great grandma in her sarong kebaya

In 1936, grandma gave birth to their first born, Kor Far in Singapore. He was raised in an Peranakan environment and had a strong influence in the jewellery trade.

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Many years of hard work in the jewelry trade

Grandpa and his son (the only Chinese) among the Indian boss and workers from Little Indian goldsmith shops.

Following World War II, grandpa acquired a new skill and started doing goldsmith work. He took on commissioned work from Peranakan families and set up his little factory with 3 craftsmen helping him in little India area (Owen Road). 2nd generation - Dad Kor Far grew up, following his father’s footsteps, and also became a goldsmith. In 1961, they moved to 27, Dalhousie Lane and it was there, that Dad – Kor Far became one of grandpa Cher Seong’s craftsmen, taking on more and more jobs from the Indian community, specializing in Batu Pahat’s style of Indian jewellery.

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Dad - Kor Far in his goldsmith shop at 115 Serangoon

After grandpa's passing, in 1977, Dad - Kor Far opened his first goldsmith shop in 75, Serangoon Road, and his second shop in 115 Serangoon Road two years later in 1979.

The flagship store

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The 3rd generation jewellers grew up in the environment of goldsmith family...

Nurturing the Next Generation of Jeweller

"A jeweller must have an eye for details. This is where you make your mark," this was how Dad Kor Far taught his children every time they were playing in the shop.

The 4th Generation: An Indonesian
style tempat sireh
(betel nut container)
that belonged to great grandmother.

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Growing up in a Peranakan Family

One of our family traditions revolves around the preparation of the Betel Leaves (duan sireh) for chewing as it was part of my Great Grandmother's past time. 

The preparation process was a tedious task as it takes many steps to enjoy the simple pleasure of chewing. Dad Kor Far was taught to prepare the sireh when he was young and appreciated the attention to the details required in order to create a simple pleasure. Hence, he had kept the Tempat Sireh to remind himself that even accomplishing a simple task requires the greatest attention for someone to enjoy the product.

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Asian Artistry

Growing up in a Peranakan family with a strong influence on Jewelry business, Asian Artistry was set up to curate the finest Peranakan Jewelry, preserving the beauty of Peranakan traditions and heritage.

The birth of the 3rd generation jewellers following the tradition...